Personal Archiving





PDA 2012 Hotel Registration

January 16th, 2012 · Uncategorized

A small book of rooms is available at the Kabuki Hotel in Japantown for PDA registrants. Please use this link to obtain the preferred pricing. Japantown is a roughly 15 minute car ride away from the Internet Archive, our conference site, and considerably easier to navigate to and fro than most downtown hotels.

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Personal Digital Archiving 2012

January 7th, 2012 · Uncategorized

Hashtag: #pda12

Schedule

Wednesday – February 22.

| 7:30 pm. Movie Screening

Lost Landscapes of Detroit, Year Two. Produced by Rick Prelinger.
RSVP required at RSVP@archive.org.

Thursday – February 23.

| 9:00-9:15. Welcome and Introduction

| 9:15-10:00. Keynotes

The Internet Archive and Personal Archives. Brewster Kahle

The Library of Congress: Personal Digital Archive Advice for the General Public.  Mike Ashenfelder, Library of Congress

| 10:15-10:30 Break

| 10:30-11:30 Cases and Examples

How my Family Archives Affected Others.  Stan James.

Unstable Archives: Performing the Franko B Archive.  Jo An Morfin-Guerrero, University of Bristol.

| 11:30-12:15 Media Types

Processing and Delivering Email Archives in Special Collections using MUSE.  Peter Chan, Stanford University Libraries.

parallel-flickr.  Aaron Straup Cope.

Remember the Web? Practical challenges of Bookmarking for Keeps.  Maciej Ceglowski, Pinboard.

| 12:15-1:45. Lunch.

| 1:45-2:00. Post-Lunch.

What I’ve learned from gardening my Brain.  Jerry Michalski, The REXpedition.

| 2:00-3:00 Social Network Data.

Arc-chiving: saving social links for study.  Marc A. Smith, Social Media Research Foundation.

Personal Interaction Archiving: Saving our Attitudes, Beliefs, and Interests.  Megan Alicia Winget, School of Information, University of Texas at Austin.

| 3:00-4:00 Systems/Tools/Platforms.

Putting Personal Archives to Work: Reminiscence, Search and Browsing.  Sudheendra Hangal, Stanford University.

Cowbird : A public library of human experience Jonathan Harris, Cowbird.

Data Triage and Data Analytics for Personal Digital Collections.  Kam Woods, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.

| 4:00-4:30 Break.

| 4:30-5:10 Lightning Talks

Personal Data Ecosystems Kaliya Hamlin

iKive: Towards a Trusted Personal Archives Service.  Christopher Prom, UIUC.

Information Packaging for Personal Archiving.  Henry M. Gladney, HMG Services.

Digital Curation for Excel (DCXL), Carly Strasser, California Digital Library.

| 5:10-5:30 Keynote.

A Data Archiving Service.  Brewster Kahle, Internet Archive.

| 5:30-6:30 Reception

Friday – February 24.

| 9:00-9:15. Welcome and Re-gear.

| 9:15-9:45 Keynotes.

Ownership, aggregation and re-use of Personal Data.  Cathy Marshall, Microsoft Corp.

| 9:45-10:30 User Studies.

What is your plan for your personal digital archives after your lifetime?  Learning from individuals.  Sarah Kim, University of Texas at Austin.

Personal Archiving in Not Personal Spaces.  Debbie Weissmann.

Use of Personal Archives: Family History Works.  Lori Kendall, UIUC.

| 10:30-11 Break

| 11:00-12:30 Academics.

Panel.  What’s being Lost, What’s being Saved: Practices in digital scholarship and personal archiving.  Smiljana Antonijevic, Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences; John Butler, University of Minnesota; Laura Gurak, University of Minnesota. Includes: Faculty Member as Micro-Librarian: Critical literacies for personal scholarly archiving.  Ellysa Stern Cahoy, Penn State University Libraries.

I, Digital: Personal collections as an archival endeavor.  Christopher (Cal) Lee, University of North Carolina.

| 12:30-1:30. Lunch.

| 1:30-2:00. Post-Lunch.

Archive Team and the Case of the Widespread Recognition.  Jason Scott.

| 2:00-3:00 Commercial Services.

The Business of Web Archiving.  Maciej Ceglowski, Pinboard.

Digital Archive for the Elderly: Facilitating Old-Fashioned Storytelling.  Jed Lau, Memoir Tree.

Every House has a History.  Stacy Colleen Kozakavitch.

| 3:00-3:30 Economics.

Modeling the economics of long-term storage.  David S. H. Rosenthal, Stanford University.

| 3:30-4:00 Break.

| 4:00-4:40 Lightning Talks

Singly: An Open Source personal data platform.  Matt Zimmerman, Singly.

Anarchive: A Performative archive within the SummerLAB’11.  Jo Ana Morfin-Guerrero, University of Bristol.

Personal Digital Photography and the Implications of Selective Positive Representation.  Eric C. Cook, University of Michigan.

Deep Personal Significance: Computer Gaming & the Notion of
Significant Properties, Jerome McDonough, UIUC.

| 4:40-5:00 Close.

What we’ve learned, and where we can go from here.  tbd.

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Registration Open for PDA 2012

October 11th, 2011 · Uncategorized

Personal Digital Archiving 2012
February 23-24, 2012

The Internet Archive
300 Funston Ave
San Francisco, CA

The Personal Digital Archiving 2012 Conference is now open for participation. We welcome proposals for session topics and speakers, as well as volunteers to help us organize and serve on site.

Relevant themes include but are not limited to family photographs and home movies; personal health and financial data; interface design for archives; scrap booking; social network data; institutional practices; genealogy; email, blogs and other correspondence; and funding models.

Conference sessions will be selected by an international peer review panel that includes:

• Ben Gross, Linde Group
• Brewster Kahle, The Internet Archive
• Cal Lee, University of North Carolina
• Cathy Marshall, Microsoft Research
• Clifford Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information
• Elizabeth Churchill, Yahoo! Research
• Jeff Ubois, The Bassetti Foundation
• Jeremy Leighton John, The British Library
• Judith Zissman, Consultant
• Lori Kendall, University of Illinois
• Peter Brantley, Internet Archive
• Stan James, independent consultant
• Steve Griffin, Library of Congress

Standard conference panels will be one hour, and presentations will be 15-20 minutes in length. To submit a proposal for a panel, presentation, or poster, please register online.

Please include an abstract of what you plan to discuss, and a brief biography suitable for posting on the conference web site.

The conference will also hold a series of 5 minute lighting talks on Friday afternoon. These will be organized on a first-come, first served basis during the conference.

Deadline for abstracts: 30 November, 2011.
Notification of acceptance: 30 December, 2011.

Late submissions will be considered on an individual basis.

Topics for discussion

From family photographs and personal papers to health and financial information, vital personal records are becoming digital. Creation and capture of digital information has become a part of the daily routine for hundreds of millions of people, and there is a growing number of commercial services, such as Facebook’s Timeline, aimed at individuals who want to preserve a record of their life.

The combination of new capture devices (more than 1 billion camera phones will be sold in 2012) and new types of media are reshaping both our personal and collective memories. Personal collections are growing in size and complexity. As these collections spread across different media (including film and paper!), we are redrawing the lines between personal and professional data, and between published and unpublished information.

But what are the long-term prospects for this data? Which institutions, technologies, standards, funding models, and services are most credible?

For individuals, institutions, investors, entrepreneurs, and funding agencies thinking about how best to address these issues, Personal Digital Archiving 2012 will clarify the technical, social, economic questions around personal archiving. Presentations will include contemporary solutions to archiving problems that attendees may replicate for their own collections, and address questions such as:

• What new social norms around preservation, access, and disclosure are emerging?
• Do libraries, museums, and archives have a new responsibility to collect digital personal materials?
• How can we effectively preserve social network data? Can we better anticipate (and measure) losses of personal material?
• What is the relationship of personal health information to personal archives?
• How can we cope with the intersection between personal data and collective or social data that is personal?
• How can we manage the shift from simple text-based data to rich media such as movies in personal collections?
• What tools and services are needed to better enable self-archiving? What models for user interfaces are most appropriate?
• What are viable existing economic models that can support personal archives? What new economic models should we evaluate?
• What are the long-term rights management issues? Are there unrecognized stakeholders we should begin to account for now?
• What are the projects we can commit to in the coming year?

Whether the answers to these questions are framed in terms of personal archiving, personal digital heritage, preserving digital lives, scrapbooking, or managing intellectual estates, they present major challenges for both individuals and institutions: data loss is a nearly universal experience, whether it is due to hardware failure, obsolescence, user error, lack of institutional support, or any one of many other reasons. Some of these losses may not matter; but the early work of the Nobel prize winners of the 2030s is likely to be digital today, and therefore at risk in ways that previous scientific and literary creations were not. And it isn’t just Nobel winners that matter: the lives of all of us will be preserved in ways not previously possible.

Background, registration, and fees

For those who register before December 25, the conference fee is $125 for attendees from non-commercial institutions; $195 for attendees from other organizations; students may register early for $100. Scholarships are also available.

Videos and detailed notes about the 2010 and 2011 conference sessions are available on this site and at the Internet Archive.

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Save the Date – PDA 2012

September 7th, 2011 · Uncategorized

Personal Digital Archiving 2012 is expected to occur February 23-24, 2012. More information on location and a call for proposals will be available soon.

Save the dates!

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Conference Videos Are Up – and other news

March 18th, 2011 · Uncategorized

Conference videos are up! Jeff Kaplan from the Internet Archive has posted all of them at:
http://www.archive.org/search.php?query=collection%3Apersonalarchiveconf

Additional thanks to all those who have posted comprehensive notes and commentary:

There are several postings about specific talks, including:

Many of the photos are quite striking:

Several people have asked about next year. That’s not settled yet, but the most likely thing is we’ll meet again in February, 2011 at the Internet Archive.

There will be a weekend meeting about personal archives near Chartres, France next month (April 15-17). The discussion will be largely unstructured, and will focus on improvements to the Grazian Archive, and development of a design prize for personal archives. Please contact me at jeff@ubois.com if you are interested in attending. There is no charge to attend, but participants must cover their own travel costs.

The mailing list for personal digital archives is restarting, visit http://list.personalarchiving.org/listinfo.cgi/pda-personalarchiving.org to subscribe.

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Conference Update

January 23rd, 2011 · Uncategorized

Here is an update on the Personal Digital Archiving 2011 Conference to be held February 24 & 25, 2011 at The Internet Archive, San Francisco. For the latest information on sessions and speakers, please see the schedule.

REGISTRATION

Register for the conference at http://pda2011.eventbrite.com/. Early bird rates end February 1.

TRAVEL AND ACCOMMODATIONS

The Internet Archive is located at 300 Funston Ave. in the Richmond neighborhood of San Francisco. Directions to the Internet Archive are at http://www.archive.org/about/contact.php

A map is available at
http://maps.google.com/maps?q=300+Funston+Avenue,+San+Francisco,+CA

Short link:
http://goo.gl/uMXdl

The Internet Archive has put on hold a block of rooms at the Hotel Tomo. If you would like to reserve one, please do so by following this link: https://reservations.ihotelier.com/crs/g_reservation.cfm?groupID=536693&hotelID=13099

We have arranged a special rate of $115 that is good for the nights of the conference as well as three days prior and after if you so wish to extend your trip. The hotel is about 20 minutes and $2 away on the Geary Street bus line, which runs every few minutes. Please contact Laura Milvy at laura@archive.org if you need any assistance with the hotel.

SCHEDULE

The conference will be held on February 24-25 at the Internet Archive in San Francisco. Doors will open at 8.30 on both days, with sessions starting at 9 a.m. and running until 5 p.m. Pacific Time. Thursday evening, there will be a reception after 5 p.m., and lightning talks in the evening beginning at 7.30 p.m. Posters sessions will be during breaks and at lunch.

The full conference schedule is at http://www.personalarchiving.com/2011-schedule/

SESSIONS

Major Projects in Personal Digital Archiving. Reports on one project with petabytes of personal materials, and another from one of the world’s great libraries.

Strategies, Tools & Services for Individuals. Tools and services for archiving personal data come and go, but the strategies for ensuring long term access to it are – or should be – more enduring. This session will focus on strategies individuals can apply, referencing particular tools and services as examples.

Makers: DIY Personal Archives. The experiences of individuals who have built their own personal archives and systems, and researchers who have tried to interpret such efforts, share their real world experiences.

Personal Archiving Systems and Interfaces for Institutions. What are the experiences and design decisions of institutions that have built systems for personal digital archives?

Making Sense of What’s Online. What are the best approaches to collecting, preserving, and interpreting social network data, news, and other online information?

Economics. What are the costs of personal archiving? What new approaches to paying these costs are needed?

Images: Capture and Collection. Billions of cameras are in the hands of billions of individuals. What is the future of this material? How will it be stored, accessed, and interpreted?

User Studies. Careful observation of archival practices reveal some surprising things about user behavior; this session covers the results of four such studies.

Archiving the Computer Industry. Founders of the computer industry reflect on the challenges of using computers to preserve their ideas creations.

Teaching, Professional Development & Theory. Personal digital archiving is fast becoming professionalized; how can it be taught, formalized appropriately, and re-conceived?

Personal Health Data. Perhaps the most critical personal data relates to health. What is and will be collected, how will it be stored and shared?

Forensics, Privacy, Security. What is the proper boundary between public and private data? How far should archivists go in collecting what might be private data?

SPEAKERS

Devin Becker (University of Idaho) & Collier Nogues (University of California, Irvine)
Gordon Bell (Microsoft Research)
Linda Branagan, PhD (Director, Telemedicine Products, Medweb)
Ellysa Stern Cahoy (Penn State University)
Evan Carroll & John Romano (The Digital Beyond)
Elizabeth Churchill (Yahoo! Research)
Richard Cox (University of Pittsburgh)
Birkin James Diana (Brown University Digital Repository)
Aiden Doherty (Dublin City University)
Christine (& Doug) Englebart
Ed Feigenbaum (Stanford University)
Rich Gibson (Gigapan Project)
Dan Gillmor (Knight Center for Digital Media Entrepreneurship)
Ben Gross (independent)
Khaled Hassounah (MedHelp)
Stan James (Lijit Networks)
Jeremy Leighton John (British Library, Digital Lives)
Brewster Kahle (Internet Archive)
Lori Kendall (University of Illinois)
Joanne Lang (AboutOne)
Cal Lee (University of North Carolina)
Kathleen Legg (National Center for Atmospheric Research)
Clifford Lynch (CNI)
Cathy Marshall (Microsoft Research)
Dave Marvit (Fujitsu Laboratories of America)
Mark Matienzo (Yale University Library) & Amelia Abreu
Ted Nelson (Xanadu)
Evan Prodromou (StatusNet)
Daniel Reetz (DIY Book Scanner)
Rudy Rucker, Sr. Science fiction author
Jason Scott (Archive Team)
Marc Smith (Connected Action Consulting Group)
Dwight Swanson (Center for Home Movies)
Jeff Ubois (conference chair)
Debbie Weissman (UCLA)
Laura Welcher (Long Now Foundation)
Kam Woods (University of North Carolina)
Gary Wright (FamilySearch)
Jason Zalinger (Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute)
Hong Zhang (University of Illinois)
Judith Zissman (independent)

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Call for participation for PDA 2011

November 15th, 2010 · Uncategorized

Personal Digital Archiving 2011
February 24 & 25, 2011
The Internet Archive, San Francisco

We are pleased to announce that the Personal Digital Archiving 2011 Conference is now open for participation. We welcome proposals for session topics and speakers, as well as volunteers to help us organize and serve on site.

Conference sessions will be selected by an international peer review panel that includes:

Ben Gross, Highlands Group
Brewster Kahle, The Internet Archive
Cal Lee, University of North Carolina
Cathy Marshall, Microsoft Research
Clifford Lynch, Coalition for Networked Information
Elizabeth Churchill, Yahoo! Research
Jeff Ubois, The Bassetti Foundation
Jeremy Leighton John, The British Library
Judith Zissman, Consultant

Relevant themes include but are not limited to family photographs and home movies; personal health and financial data; interface design for archives; scrap booking; social network data; institutional practices; genealogy; email, blogs and other correspondence; and funding models.

Conference presentations will be 15-20 minutes in length. If you wish to submit an abstract for the conference, please email topics@personalarchiving.com with:

• title of your project, paper or presentation
• a 150-300 word abstract
• a brief biography

Deadline for abstracts: 24 December, 2010.
Notification of acceptance: 5 January, 2011.

Late submissions will be considered on an individual basis.

—-

Topics for discussion

From family photographs and personal papers to health and financial information, vital personal records are becoming digital. Creation and capture of digital information has become a part of the daily routine for hundreds of millions of people. But what are the long-term prospects for this data?

The combination of new capture devices (more than 1 billion camera phones will be sold in 2010) and new types of media are reshaping both our personal and collective memories. Personal collections are growing in size and complexity. As these collections spread across different media (including film and paper!), we are redrawing the lines between personal and professional data, and between published and unpublished information.

For individuals, institutions, investors, entrepreneurs, and funding agencies thinking about how best to address these issues, Personal Digital Archiving 2011 will clarify the technical, social, economic questions around personal archiving. Presentations will include contemporary solutions to archiving problems that attendees may replicate for their own collections, and address questions such as:

• What new social norms around preservation, access, and disclosure are emerging?
• Do libraries, museums, and archives have a new responsibility to collect digital personal materials?
• What is the relationship of personal health information and quantified self data to personal archives?
• How can we cope with the intersection between personal data and collective or social data that is personal?
• How can we manage the shift from simple text-based data to rich media such as movies in personal collections?
• What tools and services are needed to better enable self-archiving?
• What are viable existing economic models that can support personal archives? What new economic models should we evaluate?
• What are the long-term rights management issues? Are there unrecognized stakeholders we should begin to account for now?
• Can we better anticipate (and measure) losses of personal material?
• What are the options for cultural heritage institutions — libraries, museums, and archives — that want to preserve the personal collections of citizens and scholars, creators and actors?
• What are the projects we can commit to in the coming year?

Whether the answers to these questions are framed in terms of personal archiving, lifestreams, personal digital heritage, preserving digital lives, scrapbooking, or managing intellectual estates, they present major challenges for both individuals and institutions: data loss is a nearly universal experience, whether it is due to hardware failure, obsolescence, user error, lack of institutional support, or any one of many other reasons. Some of these losses may not matter; but the early work of the Nobel prize winners of the 2030s is likely to be digital today, and therefore at risk in ways that previous scientific and literary creations were not. And it isn’t just Nobel winners that matter: the lives of all of us will be preserved in ways not previously possible.

Background

In February, 2010, more than 60 people met at the Internet Archive to explore common concerns about personal digital archiving. Attendees included representatives from UC Berkeley, Stanford, UNC, UT Austin, the University of Illinois, and Oxford University; Microsoft, Yahoo (Labs, and Flickr), Google, and Amazon (S3); the Smithsonian, the Magnes Museum; Xerox PARC; the Center for Home Movies, the California Digital Library, Family Search, and the Coalition for Networked Information. Support was provided by the Internet Archive, the Bassetti Foundation, and the Netherlands Institute for Sound and Vision.

Videos of the 2010 conference sessions are up at http://www.personalarchiving.com/conference2010/, and detailed notes on the conference are at http://www.personalarchiving.com/2010/02/conference-notes/.

Several projects discussed in 2010 have progressed, and we’ll have some reports on these:

  • a showcase of interface designs for personal collections
  • cost modeling for personal archives
  • guidelines for AV archives interested in preserving amateur film
  • small scale endowments for storage that can allow individuals to preserve their materials inside leading institutions

The conference fee is $95 for attendees from non-commercial institutions and $195 for attendees from commercial organizations. Scholarships and early bird discounts are available.

Registration and other conference information is available at http://www.personalarchiving.com.

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PDA 2011 in San Francisco, February 24 & 25

October 6th, 2010 · Uncategorized

Save the Date!

The next Personal Digital Archiving conference will be held February 24 & 25, 2011 at the Internet Archive in San Francisco.

The agenda is still coming together, so suggestions about speakers, topics, formats, or outcomes would be gratefully received.

We’ll be making a more formal announcement here soon.

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Conference notes

February 21st, 2010 · Uncategorized

Elspeth De Shaw took detailed notes on all of the conference sessions.

The Conference page has links to the slides, and will have links to the video recordings as they become available.

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A conference summary via Twitter hashtags

February 21st, 2010 · Uncategorized

The Twitter comments marked with #PDA2010 give a good sense for the flow of the day. James Jacobs @freegovinfo has set up a collection of them here.

And here is a pdf Tweets from the Personal Archives 2010 conference at Internet Archive just in case the search results don’t last …

Marc Smith ran a quick social network analysis using NodeXL, which produced an interesting graph of participants.

graph of social relations using #PDA2010

Social relationships among conference participants at Personal Archiving 2010.

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